Essay of romantic comedies

So why was it chosen as the best comedy ever made? What else were we going to choose? As well as being a romantic comedy, a buddy movie, a crime caper, and a musical, the film is an anthem in praise of tolerance, acceptance, and the possibility of transformation. He plays hard to get.

Essay of romantic comedies

Katherine Heigl Back in June, this viewer laughed until she cried at Judd Apatow's goofy comedy Knocked Upbut she also left the theater feeling … disconcerted. An informal poll of female friends revealed the same: They went, they laughed, they Essay of romantic comedies squeamish.

So it came as only a small surprise that sunny Katherine Heigl recently told Vanity Fair that Knocked Up is"a little sexist. It paints the women as shrews, as humorless and uptight, and it paints the men as lovable, goofy, fun-loving guys.

I'm playing such a bitch; why is she being such a killjoy? While she stands by her original statement, the movie, she stressed, was the "best filming experience of my career.

After all, the film—a hilarious exploration of the difficulties of family life in the post-feminist age—is in some ways quite uxorious, as Slate's Dana Stevens observed.

Its plot follows a schlubby slacker guy, Ben played by Seth Rogenlearning to shape up and become a good domestic partner to the pregnant Alison played by Heigl. Stylistically, though, the film treated women and men very differently.

Knocked Up made time for men to explore their choices on-screen in almost existential ways; they ask themselves whom they want to be, they joke around, they assume the right to experiment.

Women, by contrast, are entirely concerned with pragmatic issues. We never see Alison or her older sister, Debbie, pursue or express her own creative impulses, sense of humor, independent interests; their rather instrumental concerns lie squarely in managing to balance the domestic with the professional.

It's as if women's inner worlds are entirely functional rather than playful and open. Knocked Up was, as David Denby put it in The New Yorker, the culminating artifact in what had become "the dominant romantic-comedy trend of the past several years—the slovenly hipster and the female straight arrow.

Essay of romantic comedies

The film deftly shows how squabbling over Essay of romantic comedies distribution of power in a relationship can make love fade as quickly as the new linens. This is precisely the point of juxtaposing Alison and Ben's awkward attempts to create lasting intimacy out of a one-night stand with the acrimonious bickering of Alison's older sister, Debbie Leslie Mannand her husband, Pete Paul Rudd: Must domestic partnerships end up in alienated jockeying?

In one scene, we watch Debbie and Pete quarrel about who is going to bring their daughters to school as Alison looks on with discomfort and some superiority—as if assuming she'll never find herself embroiled in such disputes.

Apatow seems genuinely to want to know how so many end up in Debbie and Pete's shoes. Yet Apatow frames the female anxieties in this film in a limited way. Consider two key cross-cutting scenes at the heart of the movie, in which Ben and Pete and Alison and Debbie deal separately with their anxieties about being parents and partners.

Each couple has just split up—Debbie has left Pete because she discovers he's been sneaking off to go to the movies or play fantasy baseball with his pals while pretending he's working; Alison gets frustrated when Ben takes Pete's side in the matter and it dawns on her that he might not prove a reliable partner when the baby arrives.

The guys go to Las Vegas, where they take shrooms, get lap dances, and pay a visit to Cirque du Soleil. In the dark hours of the night, stoned out of their minds, they riff hilariously about the chairs in their hotel room. This exchange is one of the best sections of the movie—an example of strange linguistic inventiveness and comic energy.

Then, suddenly, Pete opens up to Ben, confessing that all Debbie wants to give him is love—something everyone should want, yet something he, to his confusion, doesn't know how to receive. Why would he reject such a thing? In a seemingly disconnected gesture, he tries to shove his fist down his throat.

It "tastes like a rainbow," he says. Poor Pete's dilemma, the tension he is trying to drive at, is that he can't swallow the rainbow so to speak however much he tries—and has made his wife into a disappointed micromanager in the process. He wants to be a good partner, but he also really, really wants to be able to go play rotisserie baseball and watch Spider-Man 3 by himself and riff pointlessly about chair-personalities, without anyone telling him he needs to drop his child off at school.

Not only that—he doesn't want to have to ask to do these things; he takes his right to autonomy as a given. What the film's men don't think they should have to give up, even after they become fathers, is the freedom to be playfully immature, distracted, and irresponsible.

On the other hand, Alison and Debbie get dressed up in their sexiest clothes to go out on the town but can't manage to have any fun. They try to get into a trendy club and are rejected by the bouncer, because one is "old" and the other is "pregnant. Debbie confesses that she feels embittered because Pete gets "better looking" as he ages, while she grows less attractive.

She is aging faster than she wants to in part, we understand, because she is not enjoying her marriage.

Meanwhile, Alison worries that Ben will always put his own concerns i. It's a moving scene, because Apatow doesn't rush to paper over the truth, or to imply that what Debbie says isn't the case. It also captures something sad about a marriage gone wrong: One person feels she offered a really good deal that the other shrugged off, choosing his needs over her help.

But the scene has none of the zany ingenuity of Pete and Ben's scene and lacks the verbal dexterity that peppers women's dialogue in screwball comedies. The result is dissonance.

If Apatow tries, in Knocked Up, to suggest that guys need to grow up a bit to meet women's high expectations, he, like his own characters, doesn't seem to get that maybe there's a lot more to women than these expectations.Turnitin provides instructors with the tools to prevent plagiarism, engage students in the writing process, and provide personalized feedback.

Unlike most editing & proofreading services, we edit for everything: grammar, spelling, punctuation, idea flow, sentence structure, & more. Get started now! The thesis introduces some basic conceptions of "genre" and then generally analyzes the features of the US and UK film genre especially in terms of romance comedy of US and UK film.

Holistic Solutions for Authentic Learning

The author uses Love Actually and Pretty Woman as two examples to represent UK and US romance comedy respectively. There’s more to Some Like It Hot than its sparkling surface, though. As well as being a romantic comedy, a buddy movie, a crime caper, and a musical, the film is an anthem in praise of tolerance.

JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources. Ricky Gervais co-wrote, co-produced and starred in the hit BBC series The Office, which was on air for two years and adapted for a U.S.

series for eight seasons. Gervais has also starred in films.

Literary Terms and Definitions C